Working with Indigenous Groups

With more than 30 years of engaging with Indigenous communities, our relationship is based on respect, trust, open communication and recognition that many of our activities occur on traditional lands. We’re proud to continue to build on that foundation.

Learn more in our CSR report.


Our Approach to Indigenous Relations

We believe that engaging early and often with Indigenous groups is the key to creating positive, long-term relationships.

Through regular conversations and meetings, Indigenous groups are able to share their concerns and interests with us, which in turn helps us to create pro-active project plans.

Our employees and contractors who work with Indigenous groups always do so respectfully – whether we're working on a project or an operation.

And we strive to create opportunities that support Indigenous groups through community investment, scholarships and partnering with community contractors and businesses.

Learn more by reading our Native American Relations Policy and Aboriginal Relations Policy.

Case Study

CASE STUDY:

A Role Model in Our Midst

We have been engaging Indigenous groups in Canada since 1989 – long before it became a regulatory requirement.

We're proud to say that our own Indigenous and community liaison, Peter Knight, a member of the Métis community, has earned an Aboriginal Role Model of Alberta award for his relentless efforts on behalf of First Nations and Métis communities in northern Alberta.

Making a difference

"He works tirelessly for Aboriginal people," reflects Laurie Thompson, principal of a school in Kikino where many Fort McMurray wildfire evacuees placed their children last spring.

In one incident that touched many in the community, an elderly woman who fled the disaster had left her desperately-needed walker behind. Peter, who had left his contact number in the community, instantly retrieved another walker from a local health facility and drove hours to deliver it.

"Peter goes above and beyond," says Cecil Blair, Peter's director. "He has travelled hundreds of miles across Alberta to represent TransCanada and build strong relations between the First Nations and Métis communities."

For Peter, whose mother instilled in him a strong sense of Indigenous identity and culture, it’s all about building relationships.

“I do care deeply about the community members, elders and youth I have met along the way,” he says.

"It's important to me to work for a company that values different cultural perspectives and works to identify opportunities for Indigenous businesses across the lands where we operate," he adds. "That's why I have remained with TransCanada for three decades."

Recognizing Rights

Our engagement with Indigenous groups continues to be informed by the rapidly evolving legal landscape and regulatory requirements in the countries where we operate, all of which have laws pertaining to the protection of Indigenous rights and interests. TransCanada strives not only to meet but exceed regulatory requirements. On an ongoing basis, we also track developments regarding Indigenous rights at the international level.

We acknowledge the unique governance of Indigenous groups, their rights, relationship to the land and legal standing. One way we do this is through participation agreements, which can provide compensation to Indigenous groups potentially affected by our activities.

Community Legacy

Throughout North America, our engagement team plays an important role in our community legacy work with Indigenous groups, especially in the way they develop community-led initiatives tailored to support local needs.

Our footprint spans multiple geographies and is multi-generational, just like our commitment to supporting positive, long-term relationships.

Giving back to the communities where TransCanada operates has been part of our culture for decades and remains a priority.

Valuing Traditional Knowledge

We understand that the people who have lived here for thousands of years know the land very well. That's why we seek advice from Indigenous groups regarding their cultural, traditional and ecological knowledge.

Our operations and projects benefit directly from this input as it helps us create and execute better project plans.

Aboriginal & Native American Relations Information
pdf
Aboriginal Relations Policy Brochure
3.58 MB, PDF View
pdf
Aboriginal Relations Policy Brochure (French)
3.58 MB, PDF View
pdf
Native American Relations Policy Brochure
2.00 MB, PDF View

Frequently Asked Questions

We continue to build on over 30 years of engagement with Indigenous groups. We are committed to building and maintaining long-term relationships with Indigenous groups based on respect, trust, open communication and recognition that many of our activities occur on traditional lands.

We are committed to providing business, employment and training opportunities to the Indigenous groups on whose lands we build and operate through all phases of our projects.

We work collaboratively with Indigenous communities and businesses to create mutually beneficial relationships based on a principled approach to commercial opportunities. Many opportunities are made available during construction, through our general contractors.

Visit our Vendor Registry page to sign up as a registered vendor.

We believe in Indigenous employment and training programs and work with Indigenous groups to identify training opportunities that will provide long-term mutual value. We also have a robust Indigenous legacy scholarship program, along with other trades and leadership scholarships. Learn more by visiting our scholarships page.

We support Indigenous group participation within the regulatory process through a variety of means, including resourcing capacity funding to enable the review and feedback for project information. This can include Traditional Land Use information, map review or community meetings. On certain projects, capacity funding has supported the Indigenous group in meeting capacity needs to respond to our projects. Where conditions emerge from the regulatory process, we aim to involve Indigenous communities in activities that result from regulatory conditions.

TransCanada supports the participation of Indigenous communities within the regulatory process, including resource capacity funding that enables the review of project information and community meetings. On certain projects, capacity funding has enabled the Indigenous community to hire additional staff assigned to our projects. Where conditions emerge from the regulatory process, we also do our best to involve Indigenous communities in activities that result from regulatory conditions.

Our engagement leaders throughout North America play an important role in our community legacy work with Indigenous groups. We engage with communities to develop community-led initiatives that are tailored to support local needs.

Our asset system spans many geographies and is multi-generational, just like our commitment to supporting positive, long-term relationships. Learn more by visiting our Apply for Funding page.